old time print shops

Printers traditionally wore white shirts and ties to work, a custom that lasted until the 1960s.
They took pride in an ability to work all day, with dirty type and black ink, and not soil their cuffs.
Women printers were common, occasionally in the majority on some newspapers.

 

  The Typographical Union insisted that women receive equal wages
and working condition beginning in the late 1800s. Some employers
preferred women because they were more dependable and rarely drank.
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While printers wore ties,  editors sometimes went one better: a Prince Albert cutaway.
After the paper "went to bed," apprentices were sent out for buckets of beer to celebrate.

More early print shops


 

Stories from the book "Tramp Printers"

Saratoga Printing Museum
 

History of Tramp Printers

Pages by John Howells and Marion Dearman, authors of "Tramp Printers"
Copyright  1996 and all rights reserved.

hot-metal printers encouraged to send e-mail to:
johnhowells40@gmail.com

hot-metal printers encouraged to send e-mail to:
johnhowells40@gmail.com